www.curacaoproject.eu                      CURACAO - coordination of urban road-user charging organisational issues                   Funded by the EU

Road Pricing Context

OBJECTIVES

SCHEME DESIGN

TECHNOLOGY

BUSINESS SYSTEMS

Prediction

PREDICTION

TRAFFIC EFFECTS

ENVIRONMENT

ECONOMY

EQUITY

Appraisal

APPRAISAL

Decision Making

ACCEPTABILITY

TRANSFERABILITY

Implementation and Evaluation

EVALUATION

IMPLEMENTATION

Case Studies

Bergen

Bologna

Bristol

Cambridge

Durham

Dutch National Case

Edinburgh

London

Manchester

Milan

Nord-Jaeren

Oslo

Rome

Stockholm

The Hague

Trondheim



Urban Road User Charging Online Knowledge Base

Acceptability

In Stockholm, as in other places where the issue has been raised, politicians were ahead of their voters in their attitudes to congestion charging. When the political decision was taken to conduct a trial, public opinion was predominantly negative to the introduction of charges.

But – similar, too, to what has been experienced in a number of other cities - there was a significant change in the public opinion when the system was introduced. The change was not dramatically large (about 15% more positive during the trial than before it started), but important, since it implied a change of majority from negative to positive. Other, more frequent, polls conducted within the evaluation program indicate that the larger part of the attitudinal change occurred within the first two months of the trial.

Throughout the investigated period, the proportion who thought that it was a good (or quite good) decision to carry out the Stockholm trial, was higher than the proportion who said that they would support permanent implementation of congestion charges in a referendum concerning permanent introduction. (see figure above). The final positive outcome of this question was confirmed by the result of the real referendum in which 51.3 per cent of the inhabitants in the city of Stockholm, voted in favour of a permanent solution with congestion tax.

As can be seen from the above figure opinions were more negative in the municipalities surrounding the City of Stockholm, throughout the implementation process. In connection to the official referendum in the City, a number of other municipalities too, arranged their own referenda on congestion charging. These different referenda results can not be directly aggregated to a result “for the region”, since 1) wordings differed between municipalities and 2) one third of the inhabitants in the region live in municipalities that did not arrange a referendum. Nevertheless, referendum results generally support the impression from figure above: while inhabitants in the City voted for congestion charging, inhabitants in other municipalities generally voted against.

In an attitude poll held in the autumn of 2007 and asking among other things “What is your opinion on congestion tax now that the scheme has been re-installed?”, 48 % answered that they are positive or very positive, while 27 % said they were negative, see next figure.