www.curacaoproject.eu                      CURACAO - coordination of urban road-user charging organisational issues                   Funded by the EU

Road Pricing Context

OBJECTIVES

SCHEME DESIGN

TECHNOLOGY

BUSINESS SYSTEMS

Prediction

PREDICTION

TRAFFIC EFFECTS

ENVIRONMENT

ECONOMY

EQUITY

Appraisal

APPRAISAL

Decision Making

ACCEPTABILITY

TRANSFERABILITY

Implementation and Evaluation

EVALUATION

IMPLEMENTATION

Case Studies

Bergen

Bologna

Bristol

Cambridge

Durham

Dutch National Case

Edinburgh

London

Manchester

Milan

Nord-Jaeren

Oslo

Rome

Stockholm

The Hague

Trondheim



Urban Road User Charging Online Knowledge Base

What Are The Implications For Other Themes?

The following are the implication for other themes

Objectives: The full set of objectives listed in Chapter 2 should be used to specify the overall requirements of the monitoring and evaluation plan.
Scheme design: Modification to the scheme design could follow if adverse impacts are detected during the evaluation process. This could range from strengthening public transport supply to closure of rat run routes.
Technology: Monitoring enables us to examine the potential of violation, the enforcement penalties as well as checking that the essential technology elements are working in a well-coordinated fashion.
Business Models: The business model should be capable of supporting the overall monitoring and evaluation plan. It is also vital to seek to keep transaction costs to a minimum without compromising the acceptability aspects of the transport strategy.
Prediction: While evaluation and monitoring work will be carried out following the introduction of the scheme, it is useful and instructive to compare predicted outcomes with actual attained outcomes. This in turn will help identify improvements needed in the prediction process.
Traffic Impacts: This is a vital input into the monitoring process. However it must be borne in mind that changes in traffic impacts only give an idea of what has happened. It is the objective of the evaluation and monitoring process to understand how and why these changes have occurred.
Environment: The monitoring process will suggest where the positive changes in the environment are occurring and identify steps that can be taken to mitigate negative environmental impacts.
Economy: Studying the impacts of road user charging on the economy is particularly important. From the limited literature, it is evident that there is very little information of this second order impact.
Equity: The monitoring information (primarily household and business sector case studies and surveys) will identify the major impact groups that are affected by the RUC scheme. This should then be fed into wider policy measures to reduce the impact of the scheme on vulnerable groups.
Appraisal: Whilst appraisal makes use of modelled and predicted information, evaluation is based on actual real world information. It is useful to compare the appraisal with the subsequent evaluation to judge the performance of the underlying predictive models.
Acceptability: By disseminating information gathered through a robust process of scientific data collection, acceptability can be improved. In addition, identifying key impact groups and stakeholders through the communication process can reduce resentment against RUC as a tool of transport policy.
Transferability: The general monitoring plan is transferable to urban areas considering employing RUC as a tool of transport policy. Nevertheless the details of it will differ depending on the local circumstances and local objectives. The output of such monitoring programmes will in due course improve our understanding of the principles of transferability.
Implementation: In its early stages, the monitoring plan will provide information which can be used to modify operations in order to overcome any problems emerging during the implementation phase.
No information on this theme is currently available from the case studies