www.curacaoproject.eu                      CURACAO - coordination of urban road-user charging organisational issues                   Funded by the EU

Road Pricing Context

OBJECTIVES

SCHEME DESIGN

TECHNOLOGY

BUSINESS SYSTEMS

Prediction

PREDICTION

TRAFFIC EFFECTS

ENVIRONMENT

ECONOMY

EQUITY

Appraisal

APPRAISAL

Decision Making

ACCEPTABILITY

TRANSFERABILITY

Implementation and Evaluation

EVALUATION

IMPLEMENTATION

Case Studies

Bergen

Bologna

Bristol

Cambridge

Durham

Dutch National Case

Edinburgh

London

Manchester

Milan

Nord-Jaeren

Oslo

Rome

Stockholm

The Hague

Trondheim



Urban Road User Charging Online Knowledge Base

What Are The Research Gaps?

The development of business systems is fairly mature and is generally led by private sector operators. A dialogue needs to be established between the promoters of congestion charging schemes and system providers and suppliers both to understand what opportunities exist and to ensure that market competition is developed bringing with it cost efficiencies. Having established a business system this can easily be expanded to incorporate other transport solutions bringing additional cost efficiencies to the organisation. Typical applications could include parking, real time information systems, traffic control and public transport ticketing.

As more schemes are being developed there may be a case for a standard business system solution which can be used off the shelf by the authority. The advantages are that it would reduce scheme development time, provide a robust and proven solution as well as providing cost certainty. The disadvantages are that there would be issues with ownership, upgrades and future proofing of the solution as well as concerns about ensuring competition in the market place.

One solution might be that larger cities or regional government invest in the fundamental platform to stimulate change, making available a shared service to smaller authorities who could not afford such a comprehensive approach. Ownership and operation would be retained by the smaller authority but it would give them access to a higher quality service than they might be able to achieve on their own at lower cost and it would remove the technology risk for them going forward. It could also act as the stimulus that central government needs for the adoption and progression of such schemes – not to mention realising efficiencies so cost can be driven out of associated activities in the transport management sphere. The political and administrative issues surrounding this type of shared solution are an area worthy of further investigation.

No information on this theme is currently available from the case studies