www.curacaoproject.eu                      CURACAO - coordination of urban road-user charging organisational issues                   Funded by the EU

Road Pricing Context

OBJECTIVES

SCHEME DESIGN

TECHNOLOGY

BUSINESS SYSTEMS

Prediction

PREDICTION

TRAFFIC EFFECTS

ENVIRONMENT

ECONOMY

EQUITY

Appraisal

APPRAISAL

Decision Making

ACCEPTABILITY

TRANSFERABILITY

Implementation and Evaluation

EVALUATION

IMPLEMENTATION

Case Studies

Bergen

Bologna

Bristol

Cambridge

Durham

Dutch National Case

Edinburgh

London

Manchester

Milan

Nord-Jaeren

Oslo

Rome

Stockholm

The Hague

Trondheim



Urban Road User Charging Online Knowledge Base

Conclusions

The Oslo toll ring has succeeded in speeding up the infrastructure investments in the Oslo region. In this way, investments in increased road infrastructure have counterbalanced the growth in traffic by a small positive margin (Lian 2004).

The environmental effects are positive. Air pollution levels do not seem to be negatively affected by the road investments. Local noise problems are reduced by the roads in tunnel and the fact that the traffic increase has occurred on main roads, supported by traffic management.

The general public view of the Oslo toll ring has been negative over the entire period. However, the attitude has changed over time. More people were negative before the toll ring was introduced compared to after. Also the price increase to finance Oslo package 3 reduced acceptability temporarily. When people are informed of the use of revenue, they turn more positive.

In light of the failure to implement true congestion charging schemes in urban areas (such as Edinburgh), it is clear that pure economic arguments are not enough. We live in a democracy, where economists and car drivers have the same right to be heard in general elections. The Norwegian urban toll schemes have developed with this as a clear prerequisite. This makes it necessary, also to consider the Oslo toll schemes in a political and organisational context, and consider the acceptability of the schemes discussed. Both the charging scheme and the revenue use is far from optimal from an economic point of view. Nevertheless, the Oslo packages have contributed to a more efficient transportation system both for roads and for PT. Also the packages have created a dynamic, where both the revenue use and the charging scheme have changed in the direction of a more economic efficient system. The proposed Oslo package 3 is another step in that direction.
Read more about Conclusions on these case studies: London | Stockholm | Rome | Oslo | Bristol | The Hague | Durham | Edinburgh | Bologna | Milan | Bergen | Cambridge | Dutch National Case | Manchester | Nord-Jaeren | Trondheim | (List All)