www.curacaoproject.eu                      CURACAO - coordination of urban road-user charging organisational issues                   Funded by the EU

Road Pricing Context

OBJECTIVES

SCHEME DESIGN

TECHNOLOGY

BUSINESS SYSTEMS

Prediction

PREDICTION

TRAFFIC EFFECTS

ENVIRONMENT

ECONOMY

EQUITY

Appraisal

APPRAISAL

Decision Making

ACCEPTABILITY

TRANSFERABILITY

Implementation and Evaluation

EVALUATION

IMPLEMENTATION

Case Studies

Bergen

Bologna

Bristol

Cambridge

Durham

Dutch National Case

Edinburgh

London

Manchester

Milan

Nord-Jaeren

Oslo

Rome

Stockholm

The Hague

Trondheim



Urban Road User Charging Online Knowledge Base

Implementation Process

The key barriers to the scheme were opposition prior to implementation. This included local authorities and some retailers. Fear of the unknown was perpetuated by the media who considered the idea flawed until Congestion Charging became operational.

It is testament to the strong leadership of the Mayor of London and a dedicated team at TfL that the scheme was launched in 2003 despite a number of barriers.

Barriers
  • Westminster City Council and the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea opposed the scheme and challenged it in the High Court;
  • Some retailers, notably John Lewis, opposed the scheme and through their own research concluded that charging had led to an estimated sales reduction of 7.3% at their Oxford Street store; Transport for London maintains that there is no evidence that the charge has had a detrimental effect on business performance within the zone.
  • The introduction of the scheme in February 2003 coincided with a temporary economic slowdown.
Drivers

The following drivers provide a chronological outline of some of the support that TfL consider enabled the introduction of Congestion Charging in London:

  • The scheme had political support at the national level – as early as 1998;
  • In March 2000 the ROCOL working group published a feasibility report that supported the introduction of an area-wide scheme;
  • In May 2000 Ken Livingstone was elected Mayor of London – his manifesto included a commitment to consult on road user charging;
  • In January 2001 a strategic plan for the delivery of congestion charging in Central London was presented to the Mayor and subsequently adopted;
  • An extensive public information campaign helped to launch the scheme successfully.
Read more about IMPLEMENTATION on these case studies: London | Rome | Stockholm | Oslo | Bristol | The Hague | Durham | Edinburgh | Bologna | Milan | Bergen | Cambridge | Dutch National Case | Manchester | Nord-Jaeren | Trondheim | (List All)