www.curacaoproject.eu                      CURACAO - coordination of urban road-user charging organisational issues                   Funded by the EU

Road Pricing Context

OBJECTIVES

SCHEME DESIGN

TECHNOLOGY

BUSINESS SYSTEMS

Prediction

PREDICTION

TRAFFIC EFFECTS

ENVIRONMENT

ECONOMY

EQUITY

Appraisal

APPRAISAL

Decision Making

ACCEPTABILITY

TRANSFERABILITY

Implementation and Evaluation

EVALUATION

IMPLEMENTATION

Case Studies

Bergen

Bologna

Bristol

Cambridge

Durham

Dutch National Case

Edinburgh

London

Manchester

Milan

Nord-Jaeren

Oslo

Rome

Stockholm

The Hague

Trondheim



Urban Road User Charging Online Knowledge Base

Pricing Objectives

The overall goal is to produce a mechanism that encourages modal shift away from private transport to public transport. This shift will occur by reducing the current number of private trips to the centre, both destination and through trips, on-street parking management, adjustment of PT supply and PT tariffs, according to the pricing scheme proposed.

The reduction of congestion and lowering of pollution through road pricing is expected to improve the health conditions of residents and visitors to the restricted area. Currently, the historical centre suffers from high pollution – in particular benzene, CO, NO and PM10 – which are potent health risks, especially for children. In addition, these reductions in disbenefits from transportation can lead to improved attraction to the historical centre and, subsequently, economic growth. Rome’s fiscal objectives for road pricing are to dedicate all revenue to mobility related projects.

The pricing policies in place in Rome include both payment for on-street parking and payment for accessing certain areas of the city. The main objective pursued since the beginning of the Access Policies in Rome, going back to the late 80’s, has been the protection of the unique cultural heritage of the city from the dangerous effects of traffic pollution. The turning point was the implementation of the LTZ system with “electronic gates” in October 2001.

Limited Traffic Zones (LTZ) are used to restrict vehicle access to residents and essential users (many of whom must pay a yearly charge) and are supported by paid parking schemes in surrounding areas.

The general idea is to forbid access to cars, increase the supply of Public Transport and increase the number of parking pricing slots along the LTZ cordons.

The revenues have to be used to recover the environmental externalities rising from the traffic pollution and to invest on new PT infrastructures.