www.curacaoproject.eu                      CURACAO - coordination of urban road-user charging organisational issues                   Funded by the EU

Road Pricing Context

OBJECTIVES

SCHEME DESIGN

TECHNOLOGY

BUSINESS SYSTEMS

Prediction

PREDICTION

TRAFFIC EFFECTS

ENVIRONMENT

ECONOMY

EQUITY

Appraisal

APPRAISAL

Decision Making

ACCEPTABILITY

TRANSFERABILITY

Implementation and Evaluation

EVALUATION

IMPLEMENTATION

Case Studies

Bergen

Bologna

Bristol

Cambridge

Durham

Dutch National Case

Edinburgh

London

Manchester

Milan

Nord-Jaeren

Oslo

Rome

Stockholm

The Hague

Trondheim



Urban Road User Charging Online Knowledge Base

What Are The Implications For Other Themes?

The definition of objectives is the first step of the implementation path and has obvious implications for all other themes being considered in CURACAO. It is important to identify the influence of the objectives on the pricing scheme.
 
These are the implications for the other themes:
 
 • Scheme design: The final design of the scheme is an essential element to ensure the attainment of the objectives, taking into account the different constraints.
• Technology and Business Systems: The selection of the appropriate technology and business model are influenced principally be scheme design. However, the objectives for which the scheme has been designed may have a direct influence on them, for example in terms of equity or (net) revenue generation.
• Prediction: Prediction is crucial to appraise the correspondence between scheme design and the specified objectives. Corrective actions may ensue.
• Traffic impacts: The ways in which the scheme design affects traffic flows, speeds and use of other modes will determine its ability to achieve the given objectives.
• Equity and Economy: These could potentially serve as either objectives of, or constraints on the scheme.
• Environment: Environmental protection is one of the major objectives of road pricing schemes.
• Appraisal: Appraisal needs to be based on the specified set of objectives and indicators, and may include weighting them to reflect policy priorities and trade-offs.
• Acceptability: Public and political acceptability are obviously influenced by the scheme and its impacts. These will be influenced by the choice of objectives.  Acceptability can be enhanced by limiting the number of objectives which the scheme is designed to meet, and ensuring that those objectives are clearly related to identified problems.
• Transferability: A good departing point for any transferability exercise can be the identification of cities with similar objectives; the experience of cities with analogous road pricing aims are likely to be more appropriately transferred to other urban contexts.  However, in the early stages of the development of road pricing, there is a case for evaluating schemes against the full set of objectives listed in this chapter, since this will enable other cities to identify the impacts relevant to them.
• Implementation: Clarity and consistency in the definition of objectives throughout the design process will assist in the scheme’s acceptance and smooth implementation.
• Evaluation: An implemented scheme should be evaluated against the objectives and indicators specified for it.  However, there is also a case for measuring performance against objectives which other cities might have; the list provided in this chapter can therefore form the basis for a comprehensive evaluation strategy.