www.curacaoproject.eu                      CURACAO - coordination of urban road-user charging organisational issues                   Funded by the EU

Road Pricing Context

OBJECTIVES

SCHEME DESIGN

TECHNOLOGY

BUSINESS SYSTEMS

Prediction

PREDICTION

TRAFFIC EFFECTS

ENVIRONMENT

ECONOMY

EQUITY

Appraisal

APPRAISAL

Decision Making

ACCEPTABILITY

TRANSFERABILITY

Implementation and Evaluation

EVALUATION

IMPLEMENTATION

Case Studies

Bergen

Bologna

Bristol

Cambridge

Durham

Dutch National Case

Edinburgh

London

Manchester

Milan

Nord-Jaeren

Oslo

Rome

Stockholm

The Hague

Trondheim



Urban Road User Charging Online Knowledge Base

What Are The Key Lessons And Recommendations From Progr€Ss /Cupid?

CUPID (CUPID, 2005) was a Thematic Network supported by DG TREN of the European Commission. An important part of CUPID was the liaison with eight demonstration cities constituting the PRoGR€SS project (Bristol, Copenhagen, Edinburgh, Genoa, Gothenburg, Helsinki, Rome and Trondheim). Eight conclusions related to Technology from Annex 1 of the Final PRoGR€SS Report (PROGRESS 2004), which are still considered highly relevant, are cited below:

1. GPS based systems have been shown to work

  • Develop the technology further and in doing so pay consideration to learning from the demonstrations that took place in PRoGR€SS

2. GPS based systems may not be mature enough for full-scale systems in urban areas

  • Use more mature techniques (DSRC and/or ANPR) if the road pricing scheme is to be implemented in an urban area in the very near future

3. GPS based equipment does not always work properly

  • Undertake extensive testing of prototypes before implementing the final product

4. GPS based systems are too advanced to be needed for zone charging

  • Consider ANPR or DSRC technologies, which are proven to function well, and should be compared on a cost and ease of implementation basis with GPS to arrive at a final decision

5. DSRC works successfully

  • Use DSRC technology (or pure ANPR systems), as long as it is not crucial for the fulfilment of the scheme objectives to use distance-based systems

6. ANPR works well but does not recognise all vehicles

  • ANPR can be used as an alternative to DSRC solutions – it may be cheaper and easier to implement since it requires no in-vehicle equipment, but is probably more expensive to operate

7. Non-detection and incorrect reads in ANPR systems can be reduced

  • Include overlapping fields of view for the cameras and consider twin front- and rear-facing cameras

8. It is difficult to enforce large GPS based systems at present

  • Use one of two imperfect alternatives – either onboard monitoring of the GPS based system or enforcement by mobile and stationary checkpoints.