www.curacaoproject.eu                      CURACAO - coordination of urban road-user charging organisational issues                   Funded by the EU

Road Pricing Context

OBJECTIVES

SCHEME DESIGN

TECHNOLOGY

BUSINESS SYSTEMS

Prediction

PREDICTION

TRAFFIC EFFECTS

ENVIRONMENT

ECONOMY

EQUITY

Appraisal

APPRAISAL

Decision Making

ACCEPTABILITY

TRANSFERABILITY

Implementation and Evaluation

EVALUATION

IMPLEMENTATION

Case Studies

Bergen

Bologna

Bristol

Cambridge

Durham

Dutch National Case

Edinburgh

London

Manchester

Milan

Nord-Jaeren

Oslo

Rome

Stockholm

The Hague

Trondheim



Urban Road User Charging Online Knowledge Base

What Are The Policy Implications and Implications for Other Themes?

Success in implementing road pricing in one city does not imply success in implementing it elsewhere, even within the same country. This is particularly evident comparing the London implementation vis-à-vis the failure in Edinburgh, despite the fact that some of the key design elements, including the use of ANPR technology and revenue earmarking, were similar in both cities. To identify and understand the reasons for success and failure will require significant interactions between transferability and the other themes considered in this report.

In a recent paper reviewing policy insights from urban road pricing case studies, de Palma et al (2005) raised the following points that may limit the transferability of experience of road user charging:

“Since charging is meant to deal with the externalities of transport, the physical impacts of externalities themselves depend on location specific factors such as geography, weather etc. Willingness to pay to reduce externalities is a function of socio-demographic characteristics. This implies congestion cost and the optimal level required to internalise them vary widely across urban areas.”

This is consistent with other work which has concluded that the effectiveness of road pricing schemes and their optimal network designs are sensitive to the topology of the network (May and Milne, 2004). Thus, all aspects of the geography of a city may need to be studied and taken into consideration during scheme design, prediction and acceptability assessment in order to reach sound conclusions on whether ideas taken from other situations have the potential to succeed in a particular city.

     
No information on this theme is currently available from the case studies